Veterinary Medical Associates, Inc.

Canine Vaccination Chart


Distemper is a highly contagious viral disease that affects a dog's respiratory, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems. It can be spread through the air or by contact with an infected animal and its feces, urine, or saliva. Canine distemper can be fatal.

Adenovirus Type 2, also known as Infectious Canine Hepatitis, is spread by contact with an infected animal and its feces, urine, or saliva. It affects the liver, kidneys, and cells lining the blood vessels.

Parainfluenza Virus is a highly infectious virus that can be one of the causes of "kennel cough". It spreads quickly among dogs kept in close quarters and can damage the respiratory system.

Parvovirus is a common, deadly viral infection which usually strikes puppies and infects the rapidly dividing cells of the heart and the intestinal tract. It is spread by contact with an infected dog and its blood, feces, or vomit.

Coronavirus is a viral infection of the gastrointestinal tract; usually infecting puppies less than 6 weeks of age and causing mild clinical signs which may resolve spontaneously. This disease is spread through contact with an infected dog and its blood, feces, or vomit.

Note: A puppy's natural immunity may wear off before the vaccinal immunity is stimulated. The risk of exposure may be reduced by limiting contact with unfamiliar dogs until the vaccination series is completed.


DHPP
C
D Distemper Virus
H Adenovirus Type 2 (Hepatitis) Virus
P Parainfluenza Virus
P Parvo Virus
C Corona Virus
(given with Lepto)

Puppy or Initial Series
Once every 4 weeks until 12 weeks of age. May begin at 6-8 weeks of age. Minimum of 2 vaccinations. Some breeds such as the Doberman and the Rottweiler should receive boosters every 4 weeks until 20 weeks of age.

Adult
Booster at 1 year after the initial series and every 3 years thereafter.


Leptospirosis is an extremely contagious bacterial disease that spreads through contact with nasal secretions, urine, or saliva of infected animals which include common wildlife such as deer, raccoons, and rodents. Early signs are not apparent, so infection can go undetected. This disease can cause permanent kidney damage. Recovered animals can continue spreading this disease. People can also become infected from an infected animal.
Lepto 4 Serotypes
Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae
Leptospira cannicola
Leptospira grippotyphosa
Leptospira pomona

Puppy or Initial Series
Two vaccinations 2-4 weeks apart after 12 weeks of age.

Adult
* Semi-Annual or Annual Vaccinations


Lyme Disease is a tick-borne disease that affects dogs. Infection can occur if a carrier such as the deer tick (adult, nymphal, or larval stage) is infected with the organism and gets on the pet.
Lyme
Lyme Organism
Borrelia burgdorferi

Puppy or Initial Series
Two vaccinations 2-4 weeks apart after 12 weeks of age.

Adult
* Semi-Annual or Annual Vaccinations


Bordetella is an airborne bacterial infection involved in "kennel cough". Dogs may catch this when exposed to other dogs in kennels, dog shows, and field trials.

Parainfluenza Virus as explained above.
Bordetella
Parainfluenza Virus
Bordetella bronchiseptica

Puppy or Initial Series
One dose intranasally after 4 weeks of age.

Adult
* Semi-Annual or Annual Vaccinations


Rabies is an infection of the central nervous system that results in paralysis and death. Rabies is always fatal. It is usually transmitted through the bite of an infected animal or when saliva of an infected animal contaminates a wound. Rabies is a serious public health threat. Wisconsin State Law requires that all dogs be current on their rabies vaccine.
Rabies
Rabies Virus
Puppy or Initial Series
One vaccination after 12 weeks of age.

Adult
Repeat in 1 year and every 3 years thereafter.
*
  • -The immunological protection stimulated by the vaccine for this disease is most effective for the first 6 months after immunization.
  • -The vaccine should be given annually if the possibility of exposure occurs within a 6 month period of the year. The vaccine should be given not more than 6 months prior to the possibility of exposure.
  • -If exposure occurs at different times of the year more than 6 months apart, the vaccine should be given semi-annually.

Canine Vaccines and Concerns

What is new about the vaccines?

Despite annual booster recommendations by vaccine manufacturers, challenge studies by research veterinarians in immunology have shown that some vaccines provide immunological protection well beyond 1 year and safely to at least 3 years. A booster vaccination interval of every 3 years for Distemper Virus, Hepatitis Virus, Parvo Virus, and Corona Virus is very reasonable following the initial series and the booster vaccination after 1 year.

Immunology studies have also shown that some vaccines, despite annual booster recommendations by vaccine manufacturers, may not provide adequate immunological protection for the entire year. After the initial series of vaccinations for Leptospirosis, Lyme Disease, and Bordetella, the booster vaccination interval should be every 6 months if the possibility of exposure occurs throughout the year. Annual boosters can still be an accepted interval provided the possibility of exposure occurs within a 6 month period of the year and the vaccine is given not more than 6 months prior to the possibility of exposure.


Are new diseases present?

No, but Leptospirosis is now caused primarily by two different types (serovars) of Leptospira bacteria which have not been a part of previous vaccines. The two serovars of Leptospira bacteria primarily causing Leptospirosis in Wisconsin are grippotyphosa and pomona.


Does Wisconsin have a greater incidence of some diseases?

Lyme disease has been known to be endemic to the upper Midwest. Wisconsin is considered to be a high risk exposure area.

Leptospirosis incidence is considered high in Wisconsin in relation to many other states.


Are new and safer vaccines available?

A vaccine for Leptospirosis is now available with the two types (serovars) of Leptospira bacteria, grippotyphosa and pomona.

A recent technology called Recombinant Technology has revolutionized the world of immunization producing a pure, effective vaccine designed to reduce or eliminate some of the problems seen with conventional vaccines. Presently, a Lyme vaccine is available as a recombinant vaccine.


How is Veterinary Medical Associates addressing these issues?

We are evaluating each individual dog's risk of infection to determine which vaccinations are necessary and which vaccines and vaccine protocol would be the safest. Based upon your dog's situation and the vaccines available, a vaccination program will be recommended which will not only protect against infectious disease but will also be as safe as possible.

We have increased the booster vaccination interval for Distemper Hepatitis, Parvo Virus, and Corona Virus to every 3 years. Guidelines are established to determine whether Lyme vaccine, Leptospirosis vaccine or Bordetella vaccine should be given every 6 months or annually. Vaccines produced through the most recent technology, Recombinant Technology, are used whenever available (i.e., Lyme vaccine). Vaccines incorporating all of the essential types (serovars) of bacteria to prevent Leptospirosis are used. A protocol is established to institute and to maintain a necessary level of immunological protection for each disease.

 

 

 

 

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